Childhood Cancer Facts

September is childhood cancer awareness month.

You may think to yourself, “I am aware that there is childhood cancer” but, you may not be aware of these facts…

 

Childhood Cancer Awareness Fact Go Gold

 

Cancer is a disease in which the body’s cells grow abnormally (mutate). With some cancers, the cells group together and form a lump of tissue called a tumor, (Children’s Cancer Research Fund).

 

Childhood Cancer Awareness Fact Go Gold

 

14,583 kids will be diagnosed with cancer this month alone, (St. Baldrick’s Blog).

 

Childhood Cancer Awareness Fact Go Gold

 

1 in every 285 children in the U.S. will be diagnosed with cancer.  In the U.S., one out of every five children with cancer will not survive, (St. Baldrick’s Blog).

 

Childhood Cancer Awareness Fact Go Gold

 

The major types of cancers in children ages 0 to14 years are acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), brain and other central nervous system (CNS) tumors, and neuroblastoma, which are expected to account for more than half of new cases in 2015, (National Cancer Institute).

 

Childhood Cancer Awareness Fact Go Gold

 

NCI is the nation’s leader in cancer research, (National Cancer Institute).  Unlike cancer in adults, the cause of cancer in children is often unknown. Children’s cancers do not always act like, get treated like, or respond like adult cancers.  In rare cases, other factors, such as exposure to certain viruses, chemicals, high birth weight, or radiation play a role, (Children’s Cancer Research Fund).

 

Childhood Cancer Awareness Fact Go Gold

 

About 60% of all funding for drug development in adult cancers comes from pharmaceutical companies. For kids? Almost none, because childhood cancer drugs are not profitable, (St. Baldricks).

 

Childhood Cancer Awareness Fact Go Gold

 

Common types of treatment:

 

Childhood Cancer Awareness Fact Go Gold

 

The treatment of cancer may cause health problems for childhood cancer survivors months or years after successful treatment has ended.  These health problems are called late effects.

Late effects in childhood cancer survivors affect the body and mind.

  • Organs, tissues, and body function.
  • Growth and development.
  • Mood, feelings, and actions.
  • Thinking, learning, and memory.
  • Social and psychological adjustment.
  • Risk of second cancers.

Treatments that may cause late effects include the following:

 

How you can help

You can help by spreading awareness. Not just awareness of that fact that children get cancer. But, awareness of the fact that childhood cancer is not receiving the appropriate funding, because it is “not profitable.”

Donate to a local fundraiser, or family in need.

Use the hashtags #GoGold, #Morethan4 and #ChildhoodCancerAwarenessMonth on social media.

I am going gold this month for Maddie Grace Warrior Princess who is fighting cancer for the seventh time.  Through the end of September, I’ll be donating 50% of proceeds from all merchandise and album sales to the Major family.

 

Learn more about Maddie’s story, and donate directly to the family, here.